Reviews

Kafka at RPGNet has given Adam Gauntlett’s Sisters of Sorrow 10/10. You can read the full review here.

The grouping of the imagery of life aboard the U-Boat, is counteract the quixotic, almost valiant accepted wisdom that many of us have about submarine warfare thus producing an excellent adventure that incorporates the horror war with the supernatural horrors of Lovecraft. All things considered a decidedly pleasurable and admirable mood piece for a simple one-off adventure sure to bring pleasure to players and Keepers alike.

Pookie over at Reviews from R’lyeh has written a detailed and positive review of Adam Gauntlett’s 1760s scenario, Hell Fire. You can read the full review here.

Hell Fire does a good job of bringing Lovecraftian investigation to an interesting period of history, whilst the period itself brings a sense of Hogarthian horror to Lovecraftian investigation.

Pookie over at Reviews from R’lyeh has posted a review of Adam Gauntlett’s (Not So Quiet, Hell Fire) newest Trail offering, Flying Coffins. You can read the full review here.

Overall, Flying Coffins is a very different one-shot, one that captures both the uncaring nature of the Mythos and the uncaring nature of early aerial warfare.

Pookie has reviewed our charity adventure, The Millionaire’s Special, over at Reviews from R’lyeh. You can read the full review here.

A unique setting serves to tighten a well-worn plot and so make RMS Titanic: The Millionaire’s Special a memorable one-shot.

All proceeds from the sale of this adventure will go to the Heroes in the Dark charity.

Kakfa has given Adam Gauntlett’s mini-adventure for Trail of Cthulhu, RMS Titanic: The Millionaire’s Special, 5/5 stars in his RPGNet review. All proceeds from the sale of this adventure go to the Heroes in the Dark charity. You can read the full review here.

Where the Enchanted World of First Class is contrasted with grim and grimy reality of steerage, and where a Mythos monster is unleashed to an unsuspecting ship. I can, at least, reveal one spoiler that the Mythos entity is not responsible for the sinking. 

All in all this is an excellent adventure and worth every penny.

Kakfa over at RPGNet has reviewed Adam Gauntlett’s latest Trail of Cthulhu adventure, Flying Coffins. You can read the full review here.

…it has excellent aerial rules and if your Trail of Cthulhu campaign is going to have action in World War One – then this should be a must buy

A great review of The Armitage Files from Dreams in the Lich House. You can read the full review here.

This product takes the handout concept and turns the dial up to 11 with these spectacular props.

A great and thorough review of Trail of Cthulhu from A Game of Whit’s. You can read the full review here.

Trail of Cthulhu overall provides a very complete gaming system that has a well thought-out structure and encourages investigative play by closely following the spirit of the genre. It may be a bit revolutionary for some gamers and Call of Cthulhu loyalists, but it gives a whole new way to experience the Lovecraft’s Mythos.

Pookie has posted a review of Jason Morningstar’s Many Fires on Reviews from R’lyeh. You can read the full review here.

Many Fires is strong in terms of its atmosphere, the eerie aridity of northern Mexico enhanced with oddity of the encounters… Many Fires fairly sizzles along before breaking out into a roaring inferno.

 

Andrew Brehaut has posted a review of Graham Walmsley’s The Dying of St Margaret’s on his site, A Lazy Sequence. You can read the full review here.

The Dying of St. Margaret’s is an excellent adventure and I hope to get an opportunity to run some of the other purist scenarios in future. This may well stretch groups not used to the play style but it should be entertaining none-the-less. Finally, scenario writers should steal Walmsley’s NPC portrayal notes.

Previous Entries Next Entries