This review by Matthew Pook is worth considering if only for the terrible pun of the title, Tome Team.

Given the lack of a sourcebook detailing London within the genre of Lovecraftian investigative horror, Bookhounds of London is a much, much needed resource. Although its focus is primarily the book and the booktrade, the information on outré tomes is equally as relevant to Call of-, Realms of-, and Shadows of Cthulhu as they are Trail of Cthulhu. The background to London is equally as relevant and useful to all of these games.

There is a new review of Bookhounds of London by Andrew Behaut here.

Not only does Bookhounds make me want to run a game, it makes me feel confident that I could run that game well. Many supplements place the burden of extracting a game from their contents on the Keeper; this book does not. As an unconfident and less experienced Keeper, this is excellent. If you only get one supplement for Trail of Cthulhu, this should be it.

Kafka has posted a very comprehensive and positive review of our newest print release, Bookhounds of London, 5 out of 5 stars. You can read the full review here.

Bookhounds of London is a major hardcover supplement to the Trail of Cthulhu that is: a campaign guide, locale sourcebook, and an adventure. Whomever, decides to buy it will certainly get their money’s worth and more. This is a beautifully and hauntingly illustrated book, in which the graphics are not horrific but do instill a certain sense of dread. I would commend Pelgrane Press once again for creating yet another beautiful product that is both attractive, functional and serves a multitude of purposes.

Here is a detailed review of Bookhounds by Lowell Francis over at RPG Geek. One point the reviewer raised was of particular interest – he mentioned that he was expecting more Armitage Files like handouts, and guessed, correctly that the Occult Guide will fulfil this role. If you want to run a player driven occult mystery set in the London in the style of Armitage Files, hand the players the Occult Guide and let them get on with it.

I don’t think I’ve ever read a gamebook which so carefully integrated the character of the city with the character of the play. It is an imaginary London, but one vivid and playable … Bookhounds could obviously be easily used by a traditional Call of Cthulhu GM and I’d recommend they pick it up. Anyone with an interested in London or England in the first half of the 20th Century should consider it as well.


Dan Harms over at On the Shelf Reviews has given Bookhounds a thorough examining with positive results. You can read the full review here.

To the usual Trail mix of Pulp vanilla and Purist chocolate, we now get rainbow sherbert Arabesque, rocky road sordid, and disgustingly neon Technicolor. We can only hope that Pelgrane provides more support for this line so as to give us more of what is otherwise an impressive and inspirational book.